The windows throughout your home are a gateway to the outdoors, a way to let light in when you appreciate the view of your garden, yard or landscape. The last thing you need to see is a sweaty window plastered in a coating of condensation.

Not only are windows plastered with condensation unattractive, they also can be evidence of a larger air-quality deficit within your home. Thankfully, there’s numerous things you can attempt to address the problem.

What Creates Condensation on Windows

Condensation on the inside of windows is formed by the humid warm air inside your home reaching the cold surface of the windows. It’s notably common around the winter when it’s much chillier outside than it is in your home.

Inside Moisture vs. In Between Panes

When talking about condensation, it’s crucial to know the contrast between moisture on the inside of your windows compared to moisture in between the windowpanes. One is an indoor air quality issue and the other is a window issue.

  • Moisture inside a window is caused from the warm moist air inside your home forming against the glass.
  • Existing moisture you see between windowpanes is formed when the window seal stops working and moisture gets in between the two panes of glass, and by then the window should be repaired or replaced.
  • Condensation inside the windows isn’t a window situation and can instead be solved by fine-tuning the humidity in your home. Many things produce humidity in a home, such as showers, cooking, bathing or even breathing.

Why Sweating Windows Can Be a Problem

Though you might presume condensation inside your windows is a cosmetic concern, it can be a sign your home has higher humidity. If that’s the case, water might also be accumulating on window frames, cold walls or other surfaces. Even a slim film of water can cause wood surfaces to mildew or rot over time, fostering the growth of mildew or mold.

How to Reduce Humidity Inside Your Home

Fortunately there are various options for removing moisture from the air throughout your home.

If you have a humidifier operating inside your home – whether it be a smaller unit or a whole-house humidifier – lower it further so the humidity inside your home decreases.

If you don’t have a humidifier active and your home’s humidity level is high, consider getting a dehumidifier. While humidifiers introduces moisture into your home so the air doesn’t become too dry, a dehumidifier pulls excess moisture out of the air.

Smaller, portable dehumidifiers can eliminate the water from a single room. However, these units require emptying water trays and most often service a somewhat limited area. A whole-house dehumidifier will eliminate moisture throughout your entire home.

Whole-house dehumidifier systems are managed by a humidistat, which enables you to set a humidity level just like you would pick a temperature via your thermostat. The unit will begin running immediately when the humidity level overtakes the set level. These systems work with your home’s HVAC system, so you will want to contact experienced professionals for whole-house dehumidifier installation Mobile.

Additional Ways to Reduce Condensation on Windows

  • Exhaust fans. Adding exhaust fans in humidity hotspots including the bathroom, laundry room or above the kitchen range can help by extracting the warm, moist air from these spaces out of your home before it can increase the humidity level in your home.
  • Ceiling fans. Turning on ceiling fans can also keep air swirling throughout the home so humid air doesn’t get stuck in one area.
  • Opening your window treatments. Opening the blinds or drapes can decrease condensation by preventing the humid air from being trapped against the windowpane.

By reducing humidity inside your home and dispersing air throughout your home, you can take advantage of clear, moisture-free windows even during the winter.